There is more of good nature than of good sense at the bottom of most marriages.

Essay on "Love" in letter, September 1852, to Harrison Blake
tagged: marriage

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More from Henry David Thoreau

These beginnings of commerce on a lake in the wilderness are very interesting,-these larger white birds that come to keep company with the gulls.

"Chesuncook" (1858)

The poet will prevail to be popular in spite of his faults, and in spite of his beauties too. He will hit the nail on the head, and we shall not know the shape of his hammer. He makes us free of his hearth and heart, which is greater than to offer one the freedom of a city.

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849)

I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude.

I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.

I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness.