What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.

letter, Sept. 18, 1796.

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More from Jane Austen

Only one comes back with me tomorrow, probably Miss Eliza, & I rather dread it. We shall not have two Ideas in common. She is young, pretty, chattering, & thinking chiefly (I presume) of Dress, Company, & Admiration.

Letter, November 30, 1814, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen

If the warmth of her Language could affect the Body it might be worth reading in this weather.

Letter, January 17, 1809, to her sister, Cassandra.

Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.

It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy; it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.