I am greatly pleased with your account of Fanny; I found her in the summer just what you describe, almost another sister; and could not have supposed that a niece would ever have been so much to me. She is quite after one’s own heart; give her my best love, and tell her that I always think of her with pleasure.

Letter, October 7, 1808, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen

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More from Jane Austen

I begin already to weigh my words and sentences more than I did, and am looking about for a sentiment, an illustration or a metaphor in every corner of the room. Could my Ideas flow as fast as the rain in the Store closet it would be charming.

Letter, January 24, 1809, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?

A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.

I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.

A man would always wish to give a woman a better home than the one he takes her from; and he who can do it, where there is no doubt of her regard, must, I think, be the happiest of mortals.