What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited Sketches, full of Variety and Glow?

Letter, December 16, 1816, to her nephew, J. Edward Austen. Jane Austen

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The ladies here probably exchanged looks which meant, “Men never know when things are dirty or not;” and the gentlemen perhaps thought each to himself, “Women will have their little nonsense and needless cares.”

The work is rather too light, bright, and sparkling; it wants shade; it wants to be stretched out here and there with a long chapter of sense, if it could be had; if not of solemn specious nonsense, about something unconnected with the story; an essay on writing, a critique of Walter Scott, or a history of Buonaparte, or anything that would form a contrast, and bring the reader with increased delight to the playfulness and epigrammatism of the general style.

About her novel 'Pride and Prejudice'. Letter, February 4, 1813, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen

There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.

A Mr. (save, perhaps, some half dozen in the nation,) always needs a note of explanation.

Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.