Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without affection.

Letter, November 18, 1814, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen

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I am greatly pleased with your account of Fanny; I found her in the summer just what you describe, almost another sister; and could not have supposed that a niece would ever have been so much to me. She is quite after one’s own heart; give her my best love, and tell her that I always think of her with pleasure.

Letter, October 7, 1808, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen

I do not write for such dull elves
As have not a great deal of ingenuity themselves.

Letter, January 29, 1813, to her sister, Cassandra.

One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.

But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is a part of an Englishman’s constitution.

It is very unfair to judge any body’s conduct, without an intimate knowledge of their situation. Nobody, who has not been in the interior of a family, can say what difficulties of any individual of that family may be.