Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without affection.

Letter, November 18, 1814, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen

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Nothing is to be compared to the misery of being bound without Love, bound to one, & preferring another. That is a Punishment which you do not deserve.

Letter, November 30, 1814, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen

Undoubtedly … there is a meanness in all the arts which ladies sometimes condescend to employ for captivation. What bears affinity to cunning is despicable.

History, real solemn history, I cannot be interested in…. I read it a little as a duty; but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all.

The trees, though not fully clothed, were in that delightful state, when further beauty is known to be at hand, and when, while much is actually given to the sight, more yet remains for the imagination.

There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.