Jane Austen

Quotations

There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.

What did she say?-Just what she ought, of course. A lady always does.-She said enough to show there need not be despair-and to invite him to say more himself.

A classical education, or at any rate a very extensive acquaintance with English literature, ancient and modern, appears to me quite indispensable for the person who would do any justice to your clergyman; and I think I may boast myself to be, with all possible vanity, the most unlearned and uninformed female who ever dared to be an authoress.

Letter, December 11, 1815, to James Clarke. Jane Austen

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.

I am pleased that you have learned to love a hyacinth. The mere habit of learning to love is the thing; and a teachableness of disposition in a young lady is a great blessing.

There is scarcely a young lady in the united kingdoms, who would not rather put up with the misfortune of being sought by a clever, agreeable man, than have him driven away by the vulgarity of her nearest relations.

Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does.

Where shall we see a better daughter, or a kinder sister, or a truer friend?

An artist cannot do anything slovenly.

Letter, November 17, 1798, to her sister, Cassandra. Jane Austen

Unhappy as the event must be … we may draw from it this useful lesson: that loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex.

No man is offended by another man’s admiration of the woman he loves, it is the woman only who can make it a torment.

The younger brother must help to pay for the pleasures of the elder.

With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.

Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor, which is one very strong argument in favour of matrimony.

Letter, March 13, 1817, to her niece, Fanny Knight. Jane Austen

A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.

I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage. Fidelity and complaisance are the principle duties of both; and those men who do not choose to dance or to marry them selves, have no business with the partners or wives of the neighbors.

There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them.

The post-office had a great charm at one period of our lives. When you have lived to my age, you will begin to think letters are never worth going through the rain for.