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More from Marcel Proust

What a profound significance small things assume when the woman we love conceals them from us.

"The Captive," pt. 1, ch. 1, Remembrance of Things Past, vol. 9 (1923) trans. by Ronald and Colette Cortie (1988).

That translucent alabaster of our memories.

"The Captive," pt. 2, ch. 2, Remembrance of Things Past, vol. 10 (1923), trans. by Scott Moncrieff (1929).

No exile at the South Pole or on the summit of Mont Blanc separates us more effectively from others than the practice of a hidden vice.

"The Captive," vol. 10, pt. 2, ch. 2, Remembrance of Things Past (1922), trans. by Scott Monkrieff (1929).

We are able to find everything in our memory, which is like a dispensary or chemical laboratory in which chance steers our hand sometimes to a soothing drug and sometimes to a dangerous poison.

"The Captive," vol. 10, pt. 2, ch. 3, Remembrance of Things Past (1923), trans. by Ronald and Colette Cortie (1988).

The regularity of a habit is generally in proportion to its absurdity.

"The Captive," vol. 9, pt. 1, ch. 1, Remembrance of Things Past (1922, trans. 1929).