Virginia Woolf

Quotations

That great Cathedral space which was childhood.

Moments of Being (1939-1940)

If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people.

The Moment and Other Essays (1948)

The artist after all is a solitary being.

The Death of the Moth and Other Essays (1942)

Though we see the same world, we see it through different eyes. Any help we can give you must be different from that you can give yourselves, and perhaps the value of that help may lie in the fact of that difference.

Three Guineas (1938)

Things have dropped from me. I have outlived certain desires; I have lost friends, some by death… others through sheer inability to cross the street.

The Waves (1931)

Literature is strewn with the wreckage of men who have minded beyond reason the opinions of others.

A Room of One's Own (1929)

A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.

A Room of One's Own (1929)

A light here required a shadow there.

To the Lighthouse (1927)

Mrs Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself.

Mrs Dalloway

Humour is the first of the gifts to perish in a foreign tongue.

The Common Reader (1925)

We may enjoy our room in the tower, with the painted walls and the commodious bookcases, but down in the garden there is a man digging who buried his father this morning, and it is he and his like who live the real life and speak the real language.

The Common Reader (1925)

The strange thing about life is that though the nature of it must have been apparent to every one for hundreds of years, no one has left any adequate account of it. The streets of London have their map; but our passions are uncharted. What are you going to meet if you turn this corner?

Jacob's Room (1922)

For some reason, we know not what, his childhood was sharply severed. It lodged in him whole and entire. He could not disperse it.

Essay "Lewis Carroll" (1939)

Dearest,
I want to tell you that you have given me complete happiness. No one could have done more than you have done. Please believe that.
But I know that I shall never get over this: and I am wasting your life. It is this madness. Nothing anyone says can persuade me. You can work, and you will be much better without me. You see I can’t write this even, which shows I am right. All I want to say is that until this disease came on we were perfectly happy. It was all due to you. No one could have been so good as you have been, from the very first day till now. Everyone knows that.
V.

Letter to Leonard Woolf (28 March 1941)

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

A Room of One's Own (1929)