The art of life is to know how to enjoy a little and to endure much.

"Common Places," No. 1, The Literary Examiner (September - December 1823)
tagged: adversity, fun, life

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More from William Hazlitt

When a thing ceases to be a subject of controversy, it ceases to be a subject of interest.

"On The Spirit of Controversy," The Atlas (1830-01-30)

The origin of all science is in the desire to know causes; and the origin of all false science and imposture is in the desire to accept false causes rather than none; or, which is the same thing, in the unwillingness to acknowledge our own ignorance.

Burke and the Edinburgh phrenologists. The Atlas (15 Feb 1829)

The least pain in our little finger gives us more concern and uneasiness, than the destruction of millions of our fellow-beings.

"American Literature — Dr. Channing," Edinburgh Review, (October 1829)

I hate to be near the sea, and to hear it roaring and raging like a wild beast in its den. It puts me in mind of the everlasting efforts of the human mind, struggling to be free, and ending just where it began.

"Common Places," No. 60, The Literary Examiner (September - December 1823)

You know more of a road by having travelled it then by all the conjectures and descriptions in the world.

"On The Conduct of Life" (1822)