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More from Theodore Roosevelt

In any event, even if I am beaten you must remember that we have had three years of great enjoyment out of the Presidency and that we are mighty lucky to have had them.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, Oct. 15, 1904

I generally have people in to lunch, but at dinner, thank fortune, we are usually alone.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, Oct. 15, 1904

The only man who never makes a mistake is the man who never does anything.

The timid man, the lazy man, the man who distrusts his country, the over-civilized man, who has lost the great fighting, masterful virtues, the ignorant man, and the man of dull mind, whose soul is incapable of feeling the mighty lift that thrills “stern men with empires in their brains”

"The Strenuous Life", speech before the Hamilton Club, Chicago, April 10, 1899.

There has never yet been a man in our history who led a life of ease whose name is worth remembering.