It is delightful at all times, but I think especially so after dark. The monument stands up distinct but not quite earthly in the night, and at this season the air is sweet with the jasmine and honeysuckle.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, on Washington, D.C.; letter to Joel Chandler Harris, June 9, 1902

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More from Theodore Roosevelt

Much has been given us, and much will rightfully be expected from us. We have duties to others and duties to ourselves; and we can shirk neither.

Inaugural address, March 4, 1905

I am hard at work on my message to Congress, and accordingly shall not try to go out or see any one either this afternoon or this evening. All of this work is terribly puzzling at times, but I peg away at it, and every now and then, when the dust clears away and I look around, I feel that I really have accomplished a little, at any rate.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, October 24, 1903

To-night while I was preparing to dictate a message to Congress concerning the boiling caldron on the Isthmus of Panama, which has now begun to bubble over, up came one of the ushers with a telegram from you and Ted about the football match. Instantly I bolted into the next room to read it aloud to mother and sister, and we all cheered in unison when we came to the Rah! Rah! Rah! part of it. It was a great score. I wish I could have seen the game.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, Nov. 4 1903

In any event, even if I am beaten you must remember that we have had three years of great enjoyment out of the Presidency and that we are mighty lucky to have had them.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, Oct. 15, 1904

I generally have people in to lunch, but at dinner, thank fortune, we are usually alone.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, Oct. 15, 1904