In any event, even if I am beaten you must remember that we have had three years of great enjoyment out of the Presidency and that we are mighty lucky to have had them.

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children (1919), ed. by Joseph Bucklin Bishop, letter to Kermit; White House, Oct. 15, 1904

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More from Theodore Roosevelt

Much has been given us, and much will rightfully be expected from us. We have duties to others and duties to ourselves; and we can shirk neither.

Inaugural address, March 4, 1905

There has never yet been a man in our history who led a life of ease whose name is worth remembering.

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes short again and again, who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause, who at best knows achievement and who at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.

In all his sickness Archie remembered that to-day was Mademoiselle’s birthday, and sent her his love and congratulations—which promptly reduced good Mademoiselle to tears.