Shadow of a Doubt

Quotations

Young Charlie: Mothers don’t lose daughters. Don’t you remember? They gain sons.

Young Charlie: He thought the world was a horrible place. He couldn’t have been very happy, ever. He didn’t trust people. Seemed to hate them. He hated the whole world. You know, he said people like us had no idea what the world was really like.

Uncle Charlie: I can’t face the world in the morning. I must have coffee before I can speak.

Ann Newton: The ones that say they don’t want anything, always get more in the end.

Young Charlie: We just sort of go along and nothing happens. We’re in a terrible rut. It’s been on my mind for months. What’s gonna be our future?
Joseph Newton: Oh, come now, Charlie. Things aren’t as bad as that. The bank gave me a raise last January.
Young Charlie: Money? How can you talk about money when I’m talking about souls? We eat and sleep and that’s about all. We don’t even have any real conversations. We just talk.

Joseph Newton: Don’t put the hat on the bed.
Uncle Charlie: Superstitious, Joe?
Joseph Newton: No, but I don’t believe in inviting trouble.

Uncle Charlie: I got in the habit of carrying a lot of cash with me when I was traveling.
Mr. Green: Dangerous habit, Mr. Oakley.
Uncle Charlie: Never lost a penny in my life, Mr. Green. I guess heaven takes care of fools and scoundrels.

Young Charlie: What time does the library close?
Ann Newton: If you’d read as much as you should, you’d know it closes at nine.

Ann Newton: I wish I’d been born in the South. Southern women have a lot of charm.

Young Charlie: Go away, I’m warning you. Go away or I’ll kill you myself. See… that’s the way I feel about you.

Uncle Charlie: How was church, Charlie? Did you count the house? Turn anybody away?
Young Charlie: No. Room enough for everyone.
Uncle Charlie: Well, I’m glad to hear that. The show’s been running such a long time, I thought maybe attendance might be falling off.

Uncle Charlie: What’s the use of looking backward? What’s the use of looking ahead? Today’s the thing – that’s my philosophy. Today.

Ann Newton: You’d think Mama had never seen a phone. She makes no allowance for science. She thinks she has to cover the distance by sheer lung power.

Uncle Charlie: You think you know something, don’t you? You think you’re the clever little girl who knows something. There’s so much you don’t know, so much. What do you know, really? You’re just an ordinary little girl, living in an ordinary little town. You wake up every morning of your life and you know perfectly well that there’s nothing in the world to trouble you. You go through your ordinary little day, and at night you sleep your untroubled ordinary little sleep, filled with peaceful stupid dreams. And I brought you nightmares. Or did I? Or was it a silly, inexpert little lie? You live in a dream. You’re a sleepwalker, blind. How do you know what the world is like? Do you know the world is a foul sty? Do you know, if you rip off the fronts of houses, you’d find swine? The world’s a hell. What does it matter what happens in it? Wake up, Charlie. Use your wits. Learn something.

Ann Newton: God bless mama, papa, Captain Midnight, Veronica Lake, and the President of the United States.

Jack Graham: Charlie, think. How much do you know about your uncle?
Young Charlie Newton: Why, he’s my mother’s brother.

Ann Newton: I’m trying to keep my mind free of things that don’t matter.

Joseph Newton: We’re not talking about killing people. Herb’s talking about killing me and I’m talking about killing him.

Young Charlie: We’re not just an uncle and a niece. It’s something else. I know you. I know you don’t tell people a lot of things. I don’t either. I have a feeling that inside you there’s something nobody knows about… something secret and wonderful. I’ll find it out.

Young Charlie: Your picking us as an average family kind of gave me a funny feeling.
Jack Graham: What kind of a funny feeling?
Young Charlie: Oh, I don’t know. I guess I don’t like to be an average girl in an average family.
Jack Graham: Average families are the best. Look at me. I’m from an average family.
Young Charlie: As average as ours?
Jack Graham: Sure. Besides, I don’t think you’re average.